Technologies new blogTechnologies new blog

iOS 16’s editing feature puts the ‘mess’ in messages

iPhone users rejoiced with the release of iOS 16’s ability to unsend and edit messages. Apple promoted the features as helpful ways to correct typos or retract messages sent by accident, but some users are thinking more nefariously. Since iOS 16 came out earlier this month, the conversation has taken a turn towards the land of sin: lying, cheating, and gaslighting. These undo send and edit message features just became — flawed as all humans are — new methods for being sneaky. With a few taps of a finger, people can edit or remove an illicit message as though their secret wrongdoings never existed. Here are some of the ways people are scheming:

If you unsend a message, it’s like it never happened right?

Tweet may have been deleted (opens in a new tab)

Tapping “undo send” just became a new tool in the gaslighter’s repertoire.

Tweet may have been deleted (opens in a new tab)

Seeing a disclaimer that a message has been sent, then deleted, will undoubtedly trigger some trust issues…

Tweet may have been deleted (opens in a new tab)

…and for good reason, since this user wants to take their infidelity to the next level

Tweet may have been deleted (opens in a new tab)

Speaking of which, using undo send isn’t the best way to cheat. Apple users who haven’t upgraded to iOS 16 can still see the deleted message.

Tweet may have been deleted (opens in a new tab)

And if the recipient does have iOS 16, you only have two minutes to erase your crime or 15 minutes to…uh…edit your crime.

Tweet may have been deleted (opens in a new tab)

Some are just happy to add to the chaos…

Tweet may have been deleted (opens in a new tab)

…while others just want to go back to the good old days when a message went out into the world untouched.

Tweet may have been deleted (opens in a new tab) Tweet may have been deleted (opens in a new tab)

Source

Press ESC to close